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      Blog :: 03-2021

      What It Means To Be in a Sellers' Market

      What It Means To Be in a Sellers Market | MyKCM

      If you’ve given even a casual thought to selling your house in the near future, this is the time to really think seriously about making a move. Here’s why this season is the ultimate sellers’ market and the optimal time to make sure your house is available for buyers who are looking for homes to purchase.

      The latest Existing Home Sales Report from The National Association of Realtors (NAR) shows the inventory of houses for sale is still astonishingly low, sitting at just a 2-month supply at the current sales pace.

      Historically, a 6-month supply is necessary for a ‘normal or ‘neutral’ market in which there are enough homes available for active buyers.

      :What It Means To Be in a Sellers Market | MyKCM

      When the supply of houses for sale is as low as it is right now, it’s much harder for buyers to find homes to purchase. As a result, competition among purchasers rises and more bidding wars take place, making it essential for buyers to submit very attractive offers.

      As this happens, home prices rise and sellers are in the best position to negotiate deals that meet their ideal terms. If you put your house on the market while so few homes are available to buy, it will likely get a lot of attention from hopeful buyers.

      Today, there are many buyers who are ready, willing, and able to purchase a home. Low mortgage rates and a year filled with unique changes have prompted buyers to think differently about where they live – and they’re taking action. The supply of homes for sale is not keeping up with this high demand, making now the optimal time to sell your house.

      Bottom Line

      Home prices are appreciating in today’s sellers’ market. Making your home available over the coming weeks will give you the most exposure to buyers who will actively compete against each other to purchase it.

      10 Credit Mistakes That Could Cost Buyers Their Dream Home

      A few years ago, in a similar market to the one we are currently experiencing, we managed to get buyers into a contract on the home of their dreams. It took a lot of effort; they were blown out in many multiple offer situations before we finally managed to ink a deal. Needless to say, they were ecstatic.

      A week later, as they pulled up to the property to meet with the inspectors, I noticed they were driving a brand-new BMW. “You borrowed that car, right?” I queried. 

      The husband proudly proclaimed, “No — it’s ours — now that we know we are going to have a garage, we bought a car to go in it.” 

      Speechless for a moment, I gathered my thoughts and then said, “I’m sorry to say this, but you no longer have a garage. In fact, you no longer have a house.”

      Unfortunately, their new car purchase pushed their debt ratio over the limit, and they no longer qualified for the mortgage required to purchase the home. That was a day of bitterness for the buyers and of reckoning for me. 

      It marked a new phase in my career: a commitment to make sure I changed the messaging we provide to buyers before they begin looking for homes so that mistakes like this would never happen again.

      We now schedule a meeting with all our buyers before opening the door to any prospective home. Although we cover many topics in our time together, we pay special attention to credit do’s and don’ts and potential financial mistakes to avoid once they get into contract.

      Here are the top 10 things we now advise them never to do once they begin looking to buy a home:

      1. Don’t apply for new credit

      Most people understand this, but some get so excited about getting new digs they start setting up lines of credit with furniture stores, home improvement centers and the like. 

      Every time a buyer applies for new credit, their credit will be pulled by a potential creditor or lender, and they run the risk of immediately losing points on their credit score.

      2. Don’t make any large purchases

      We advise our clients to hit their “patience button” and avoid any large purchases until escrow has closed. Even though we explain this to all of our buyers upfront, we constantly get pinged with questions such as, “The appliances I want just went on sale — I can save hundreds. Are you sure I cannot buy now?” 

      We explain that if they have significant enough reserves that they can pay cash, go ahead. If they need to buy with credit, they need to hold off.

      3. Don’t pay off collections or ‘charge offs’

      This point might seem counterintuitive, but let your clients know that if they want to pay off old accounts, do it through escrow. Once the debt is paid, make sure they get a “letter of deletion” from the creditor.

      4. Don’t close credit card accounts

      If you close credit accounts, it might appear that your debt ratio has gone up. Closing credit cards will affect other factors in the score, including credit history. Lenders use active credit lines to establish creditworthiness, so they need to stay active. 

      Once, our clients preemptively assumed that it would be best to have a little credit exposure as possible, so they closed all their credit lines before applying for a loan, only to discover it was the worst thing they could have done.

      5. Don’t max out or overcharge credit card accounts

      Tell them to keep credit card balances below 30 percent of their limit during the loan process. If a buyer pays down balances, do it across the board. If possible, keep credit card spending to a minimum during the homebuying process.

      6. Don’t consolidate your debt

      When consolidating debt onto one or two cards, it appears that the buyer is “maxed out” on that card and will therefore be penalized.

      7. Don’t change bank accounts

      Do not close accounts, open new accounts or change banks altogether. This sends off all kinds of warning signals to loan underwriters.

      8. Don’t deposit cash into your bank accounts

      Instruct your buyer to talk to their lender before making any cash deposits. If the money is from a family member, it must be accompanied by a gift letter. 

      If it is cash from any other source, the lender will need to verify its’ source before it hits their account. In the same way, buyers should not arbitrarily transfer money from one account to another.

      9. Don’t co-sign loans with anyone

      This is never a good idea to begin with, but while your buyers are getting a loan of their own, it’s forbidden.

      10. Don’t do anything weird

      Instruct your buyers to avoid things that will cause a red flag to be raised by the scoring systems, including changing their name or address, missing payments, making late payments or changing spending patterns.

      It’s hard enough to get into contract these days — make sure your buyer does not financially self-destruct along the way.                       

      As seen in INMAN Real Estate News  Written by: Carl Medford is the CEO of The Medford Team.

      How Smart Is It to Buy a Home Today?

      How Smart Is It to Buy a Home Today? | MyKCM

      Whether you’re buying your first home or selling your current house, if your needs are changing and you think you need to move, the decision can be complicated. You may have to take personal or professional considerations into account, and only you can judge what impact those factors should have on your desire to move.

      However, there’s one category that provides a simple answer. When deciding to buy now or wait until next year, the financial aspect of the purchase is easy to evaluate. You just need to ask yourself two questions:

      1. Do I think home values will be higher a year from now?
      2. Do I think mortgage rates will be higher a year from now?

      From a purely financial standpoint, if the answer is ‘yes’ to either question, you should strongly consider buying now. If the answer to both questions is ‘yes,’ you should definitely buy now.

      Nobody can guarantee what home values or mortgage rates will be by the end of this year. The experts, however, seem certain the answer to both questions above is a resounding ‘yes.’ Mortgage rates are expected to rise and home values are expected to appreciate rather nicely.

      What does this mean to you?

      Let’s look at how waiting would impact your financial situation. Here are the assumptions made for this example:

      • The experts are right – mortgage rates will be 3.18% at the end of the year
      • The experts are right – home values will appreciate by 5.9%
      • You want to buy a home valued at $350,000 today
      • You decide on a 10% down payment

      How Smart Is It to Buy a Home Today? | MyKCMHere’s the financial impact of waiting:

      • You pay an extra $20,650 for the house
      • You need an additional $2,065 for a down payment
      • You pay an extra $116/month in your mortgage payment ($1,392 additional per year)
      • You don’t gain the $20,650 increase in wealth through equity build-up

      Bottom Line

      There are many things to consider when buying a home. However, from a purely financial aspect, if you find a home that meets your needs, buying now makes much more sense than buying next year.

       

       

      The information contained, and the opinions expressed, in this article are not intended to be construed as investment advice. Keeping Current Matters, Inc. does not guarantee or warrant the accuracy or completeness of the information or opinions contained herein. Nothing herein should be construed as investment advice. You should always conduct your own research and due diligence and obtain professional advice before making any investment decision. Keeping Current Matters, Inc. will not be liable for any loss or damage caused by your reliance on the information or opinions contained herein.

      We believe every family should feel confident when buying and selling a home.

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